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Update From Modern Aging Singapore: Kickoff Workshop

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Modern Aging Singapore kicked off in the middle of August. So far, the program has seen active participation and support from aspiring entrepreneurs. About three hundred students, health practitioners, researchers, and members of the public attended the Kickoff Workshop held at the NUS I Cube Building Auditorium on the morning of August 15.

Attendees were treated to four presentations from experts in aging and business: Overview of Aging by Prof. Angelique Chan of Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Healthcare and Business by Dr. Jeremy Lim of Oliver Wyman, Home and Center Based Care by Dr. Ng Wai Chong of the Tsao Foundation, and Product Design for Seniors by Hunn Wai of design firm Lanzavecchia + Wai.

MA2Prof. Chan highlighted some key trends and statistics on aging in Singapore. One surprising point was the high prevalence of social isolation among seniors here. This finding spurred aspiring entrepreneurs to think of novel solutions to address this trend.

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Dr. Lim went on to outline the aging sector in terms of business potential. One suprising finding, according to theNational Center for Policy Analysis, is the average net worth in 2010 was 848,000 USD for sixty five to seventy four year olds and nearly seven hundred thousand dollars for those above seventy five. These figures encouraged aspiring entrepreneurs to enter the aging sector.

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Dr. Ng discussed the current status of home and center based care in Singapore. He highlighted specific needs in these care settings frequently used by seniors. This discussion allowed aspiring entrepreneurs to hone in on key areas of need and address these pain points. For example, some challenges in these settings include the quick and painless transferring of patients from bed to chair and vice versa, and increasing the time health practitioners can spend with seniors.

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Mr. Wai rounded off the presentations with insights from product and design perspectives. He introduced examples of good design for seniors, such as mixed use canes and walkers, or stylish back braces. This presentation especially inspired aspiring entrepreneurs to consider seniors’ lifestyles and tastes when introducing new product ideas.

In addition to expert presentations, attendees also heard two senior role models share their life experiences and lessons. Younger members of the audience seemed glad to hear the wise advice dispensed by the seniors. The kickoff event concluded with a networking lunch. Participants became so engrossed in conversations around aging that they lingered past the scheduled end time.

Currently, Modern Aging Singapore has progressed to the business curriculum and selection phase. The top twenty teams have been selected and paired with industry mentors to hone their business ideas. The twenty teams will soon be pitching at the semifinals judging event for the top six spots. Meanwhile, all participants of Modern Aging Singapore are able to access the same business and aging curriculum on the Modern Aging Online Learning Portal to continue learning and improving their business ideas. If you would like to access the Portal, please write an email request to info@modernaging.org.

Find out more about Modern Aging, at www.modernaging.org.

A New Perspective: Design Thinking for the Elderly

This post is the first in a series of articles focused on design thinking and aging. In future posts, we will explore the use of personas in designing solutions for seniors. We will also address problems identified by seniors themselves.

Imagining the ecosystem surrounding seniors in Singapore. Examples given are not exhaustive.

Imagining the ecosystem surrounding seniors in Singapore. Examples given are not exhaustive.

Last week, the ACCESS Health Singapore team attended a DesignSingapore forum titled Rethinking Health and Wellness for the Elderly. Among the fresh perspectives and opinions shared at the forum, one point really stood out to us: Often, designers who design products for seniors view seniors as isolated individuals. In reality, the elderly live and interact with others in their families and communities, such as family members and health professionals. They engage others in their external environment multiple times throughout the day: when getting coffee, seeing their neighborhood doctor, seeing specialists at hospitals, visiting community centers, going to the supermarket, and even through online sites and discussion boards. Behind these interactions, or touchpoints, lie many higher level entities that share an active interest in the wellbeing of the elderly, such as ministries or charities.

This learning point came from applying design thinking and ethnography to aging. One principle of design thinking is that all design activity is social in nature. Ethnography aims to explore social phenomena from the point of view of the subject, in this case seniors. At the forum, videos were shown of interviews with various seniors and their caregivers. These seniors and caregivers were asked what challenges they faced in daily living. Beyond these answers, researchers also followed the seniors on their daily activities, like cooking and exercising, in true ethnographic fashion.

In one clip, a frail senior was shown cooking for himself. His legs are weak so he sits on his wheelchair at the stove. But this position is often low and awkward. Upgrading to an adjustable height chair could make cooking easier for him.

A video still showing a senior cooking. An adjustable height chair could make cooking easier. (Photo: DesignSingapore)

A video still showing a senior cooking. An adjustable height chair could make cooking easier. (Photo: DesignSingapore)

One woman interviewed in the video had left her job to care for her father full time. Even while providing fulltime care, she said, there are moments when she cannot be there, physically, to catch her father if he falls. Such personal examples peppered the forum, turning abstract issues into real and moving stories.

When we think of the people, places, and organizations seniors interact with, many opportunities come to light. One senior featured in the video had lost his leg to amputation due to diabetes. After being fitted with a prosthetic, he still found it tiring to navigate his neighborhood. He told the interviewers that he was truly glad to receive a motorized personal vehicle from a welfare organization. Some limitations remain. Narrow corridors and places without ramps are inaccessible to him. However, he is now able to take public trains and go shopping, everyday tasks that would have been nearly impossible before. The motorized vehicle has improved his quality of life. In this case, an organization found a solution that has allowed this senior to engage more with the people and places around him.

A motorized personal transport like the one pictured can help seniors unlock and explore more of their community and environment. (Photo: Free Images)

A motorized personal transport like the one pictured can help seniors unlock and explore more of their community and environment. (Photo: Free Images)

Engaging ethnography and design thinking for the elderly may seem unconventional. But some researchers acknowledge the benefit of taking into account social and environmental aspects of aging. A recent BMJ article reviewed existing ideas and concepts of Successful aging refers here to physical, mental, and social wellbeing in older age. The authors found that traditional conceptions of successful aging focused largely on individual bodily health. For example, the Activities of Daily Living scale tests a senior’s ability to complete a basket of self care tasks. These tasks include feeding, toileting, and grooming.

The authors found in their review that psychosocial and external factors are important to successful aging too. Yet, the authors found that these factors are underrepresented in traditional models of successful aging. For example, the Activities of Daily Living scale does not measure social activities such as holding a conversation or enjoying a sport outdoors. The authors wrote, “[Successful aging] is clearly not simply a physiological construct, so it seems intuitive that psychosocial components should be included in otherwise biomedical models of [successful aging].” The authors concluded that conventional models for aging can benefit from including social and external components of seniors’ lives.

Design thinking and ethnography can be applied at all levels of the ecosystem surrounding seniors. Consider seniors, the people they interact with, the people and places they engage with, and the organizations that help support them. Imagine a senior living out a typical day in this environment. What gaps and opportunities do you see? Are there any potential collaborations between organizations? We feel these added perspectives will help craft more targeted, efficient products and solutions to help seniors.

Retirees on Speaking Exchange with Brazilian English students

Ideas sometimes seem so simple and obviously great, so you ask yourself ”Why has nobody come up with that before?!”

I came across the innovative Speaking Exchange project, which is about lightening up the lives of elderly, while at the same time giving Brazilian students the opportunity to practice their English skills. Reports about this case seem to go viral on the web these very days (see links below).

The idea was established by FCB Brazil, and put into practice together with the CNA language school in Liberdade, Brazil and the Windsor Park Retirement Community in Chicago.

I was so surprised and fascinated when I watched this clip about the Speaking Exchange:

The man shows the boy an old photo. “Is this your dad?” the boy asks. “No, It’s me and my wife when we were young”, he answers. “Oh you were good-looking when you were young”, the boy says – pause – “and you are still good-looking!”. Screen Shot 2014-05-10 at 18.30.04

“I look like I’m only 25”, another man says. He and the boy a are laughing, “but I’m 88”. The two are having a nice conversation. In the end, they share a big, virtual hug.

The school uses its own digital tool for video chatting where conversations are recorded and uploaded privately for teachers to evaluate the talk language-wise.

But there is much more to this than just the language…

It’s fun and warms my heart to listen to their conversations about all the World and his brother.

article-2622691-1DA63EDB00000578-207_634x454     article-2622691-1DA63ED300000578-882_634x452

Read more:

http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/perfect-match-brazilian-kids-learn-english-video-chatting-lonely-elderly-americans-157523

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2622691/Lonely-American-retirees-help-Brazilian-students-practice-English-video-chat-make-unexpected-new-friends-process.html#ixzz31CnIZP41

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/brazilian-kids-learn-english-through-heartwarming-webcam-chats-with-retired-americans-9337136.html

Modern Aging: inBelly

Today’s blog post is written by Kristina Saudargaite who is the founder of inBelly. This organization is already helping children at schools to have better food by identifying and classifying additives. Now, inBelly wants to branch out to another sensitive target group, the elderly. Read Kristina’s story here:

My name is Kristina Saudergaite and I love food. I love eating, cooking, going to the grocery store etc.  I also love knowing what I eat. For this purpose, my friends and I once looked at the ingredient list. We saw many chemical names that we could not understand or tell how they affect our health. Thus, we checked.

The results shocked us! Commonly used E250 is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as probably carcinogenic to humans or in simple words it is likely to cause cancer. E211 or sodium benzoate is not harmful on its own; however, it reacts with vitamin C and releases benzene – a known toxin. And who does not eat products often containing E211 such as shrimps together with a slice of lemon or maybe drinking Must with a salad

These are only a few examples; but food is increasingly stuffed with chemicals and this puts our health at risk.

The amounts of additives that may cause adverse effects are regulated by the EU. The problem lies in the fact that tests are made on healthy individuals (or animals). However, sensitive subgroups such as the elderly may be much more susceptive to the additives and adverse health effects related to them. Nursing homes do not have enough information to make sure that the food they buy do not contain harmful ingredients.

inBelly has the expertise and a rigorous database on food additives. Moreover, we have a technological solution that enables to quickly check if a product contains anything harmful.

In Sweden we have found many food products containing additives banned in other countries, such as Canada and/or linked to diseases. This knowledge exists in academia and in public documents but since the information is presented in a complicated and scattered manner, it rarely reaches the wider public. inBelly is unique since it uses official and scientific information about food additives and depicts it in a non-scientific “easy-to-understand” kind of way. The app simply shows a sign indicating that the scanned product contains additives banned in other countries. Our service innovation lies in using a mobile solution to translate knowledge from academia into simple visual signs in order to make the information quickly and easily available to everyone. With our mobile app people can scan barcodes and get information whether this particular product contains any ingredients that may be linked to diseases. The initiative won the Stockholm Innovation award in the service category 2012.

We are currently using this knowledge to help pre-schools to choose better food. We are cooperating with the chef at Globala Gymnasium to go through the products they purchase and analyse if any of them contain additives that may be harmful. This helps the institutions to ensure better food.

Since the elderly, similarly to children, is a sensitive group, we plan to offer our services to help nursing homes to go through the food they serve the elderly and check if they contain harmful additives. This would ensure good quality food and best possible health and wellbeing for the elderly.

Follow inBelly on facebook.com/inBelly or on Twitter @inbelly_guide

Source: http://www.socialinnovation.se/sv/modern-aging-blog-inbelly/

inBelly Logo

Modern Aging: Cross-generational housing

Three young women have come up with an idea that solves two problems with one solution; social isolation among elderly and shortage of housing for students. Here is their story;

Gabriela, an economist from Czech Republic; Bibiana from Colombia with higher education background in political science and Kika from Spain with higher education background in history. Although each of us had different reasons to move to Sweden, our interest in entrepreneurship and innovation in the social sector brought us together.

Daily, we encounter people around the city that even though they are senior they manage to live independently by themselves. At first, we were positively surprised by this, but when we looked closer on the psychological and social factors that affect the health and quality of life among the older people, we realized that loneliness is one of the most important problems within this population in Sweden. A problem that becomes very costly for society in the cases where it leads to depression, additional to the obvious personal suffering for the people being lonely.

Our innovation is to develop a tool to identify and match older people living alone and having a spare room in their homes with students in need of accommodation in Stockholm. Our project is called Tillsammans, which means Together in Swedish. It is a simple solution with the potential to enrich the lives of both students and elderly by creating daily inter-generational meetings as well as saving money for society.

Our project will use already existing resources; contribute to the social cohesion and strengthen the social networks.

We are aiming to find partners from the elderly care sector, pensioners’ organizations, universities and any other interested in improving the lives of the elderly.

Being part of the Modern Aging program gives us a unique opportunity to meet entrepreneurs, mentors and professionals from the S

wedish health care sector. Thanks to the network of those professionals and their intensive coaching we are building a concept around our idea and turning it into reality.

Old and young

Source: http://socialinnovation.se/sv/modern-aging-blog-tillsammans/

http://homeshare.org/picture-library/austrianimage_austria-bmp/

Modern Aging: Ask for Answers

This week’s Modern Aging blog post comes from an American medical illustrator with a passion to improve health communication for elderly through visual media. Please read about the digital tool she is developing:

“I am excited to share with you an idea I have been developing as a social innovation for the elderly in health care. Today I will tell you about myself, and why I am considering the health needs of the elderly in Sweden. I will introduce the problem needing attention and how I propose to tackle it. Finally, I will let you know how you can connect with me if you would like to be part of this dialogue!

So who am I, and what brought me to Sweden?  Well, my name is Anneliese, and I am an American citizen with Swedish heritage from both sides of my family. In 2010 I traveled to the “motherland” to see where my farmor, and my mormors parents came from. While visiting, I bonded with new friends and distant relatives, but visiting with relatives from my grandparent’s generation over fika was particularly special for me. During that trip I decided I wanted to come back to Sweden to study and experience more of Swedish society.

While back in the US making plans to return to Sweden, I was witness to the failing health and death of my mormor, Anna, and morfar, Winston. Winston lost his life, at 93 years of age, as a result of Alzheimer’s. While Anna, who suffered from morbidities common in the elderly, died only a few months after at 91 years. These experiences with my own family helped me to realize many of the challenges facing our aging global population.  Now, I look to apply my education, work experience and research to help address these challenges.

My recent research has focused on the communications between patients and their care providers. The clinical setting can present many communication barriers, including a power dynamic between the patient, with limited knowledge, and the care provider, with greater knowledge. For the elderly, dementia, learning style, literacy and language skills can also contribute to communication barriers they face when determining their health needs. Further, many elderly patients have an increased number of health appointments where they might struggle to remember what to ask their care provider, or may not be aware of the proper questions to ask. Additionally, they will need to remember details communicated to them after an appointment. If not recorded, these details can be easily forgotten. My solution is simple, “Ask for Answers.”

Ask for Answers is a media based tool (web/app), which aims to arm the aging population with the questions they should have available when visiting a health provider. The questions target their specific communication needs and are broken down by medical specialties to be more effective. Patients can use the electronic interface to access their questions, type answers, exchange email with the provider, record audio of answers – which can then be transcribed, and even take photos of drawings or notes. The information would then be accessible later when the patient may have trouble recalling details from the appointment, or need to share them with another care provider.

Ask for Answers is centered on improving health communications between care providers and the elderly. It is a simple, user-friendly tool that focuses on enabling and empowering aging patients to better manage their health. With the aid of Ask for Answers, patient knowledge and satisfaction may increase, potentially resulting in improved health outcomes.”

Written by Anneliese Lilienthal

 

Source: http://socialinnovation.se/sv/future-of-elderly-care-may-be-answered-by-the-questions-we-ask/Visual health communication

Modern Aging ideas – new blog series

Our most loyal readers on Silverevolution may remember the program Modern Aging that we wrote about in April (see the post HERE). This innovation program for young entrepreneurs with ideas for the elderly kicked off in August this year. A group of 7 entrepreneurs have been selected based on the potential of their improvement idea as well as their motivation to lead the way in transforming the elderly care sector. We are currently in the act of developing their ideas with the help of mentors and coaches and in close discussion with the elderly themselves. During the next couple of weeks the participants will blog about their ideas on the Forum for Social Innovation Sweden and we will post them here on Silverevolution as well.

First in line; introducing himself and his idea is Victor Nordlind. This is his story:

One may ask why a person who is attending one of the world’s top hotel schools would want to pursue a career in developing and improving the elderly care. Most people expected me to walk in my father’s footsteps in the restaurant industry, rather than radically changing field to Elderly care.

But as I was required to carry out a feasibility study about an existing retirement home during my first two years at Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne (EHL), I was given the opportunity to see the true potential within this industry. It encouraged me to apply for an internship within elderly care, which I am currently pursuing within Strategy and Business Development at Ambea Sverige, whose affiliation is Carema Care. For me, elderly care is an industry where innovation is necessary in order to provide the correct quality of life, which in my opinion is the meaning of hospitality.

When I first came across the Modern Aging program, I did not have a specific idea for elderly in mind. When developing the idea, it was equally important to link the project back to my studies, as to work with something that may truly make a difference within the elderly sector. I decided to contact a friend who has several years of experience within elderly care, and who is currently working in a nursing home here in Sweden. I was convinced that my determination combined with her extensive experience would bring something innovative out of the meeting.

As expected, we had a very interesting discussion, which brought several ideas to the table. Most of them were linked to the use of more technology, which is a frequently debated topic when talking about improvements within elderly care. The trend of using technology to improve efficiency is relatively new in the industry while it has been an essential part of the hotel and restaurant industry for years. More and more apps and other technical devices are being developed to simplify everyday activities for the elderly.

However, one question that came up during the meeting was “how can we use technology to better involve the caregivers within elderly care?” These professionals have valuable knowledge and experience, which they should be able to share easily. With today’s progression of social media and online forums, a place for caregivers and other health care professionals to meet online should be developed. There, they may share ideas, knowledge and ask questions to one another over space and time. This will not only simplify and streamline the daily work, but it will also improve the quality of care in nursing homes in the long run. A forum like this needs to be strictly confidential with only registered users permitted access. The idea is also that this platform shall be the forum that compiles and disseminates knowledge of the latest advances in medical, social and technological solutions for the elderly.

My current internship at Ambea combined with the Modern Aging program has helped me to better understand the current market as well as the future prospects of elderly care in Sweden. To date, Modern Aging has hosted several seminars and workshops carried out by inspiring guest speakers from various fields, such as young entrepreneurs, lecturers from top universities, and professionals from the public health care sector. With this promising start, I am curious and eager to find out where the program is going to take us.

Victor Nordlindphoto_1