Exercising to music may reduce fall rates

A Geneva-based elderly research has shed light on the benefits of exercising to music. Swiss doctors revealed that music-based exercise routines can enhance the strength and balance of the elderly people, hence decreasing the rate of falls.

The year-long research required elderly participants to execute a series of exercises to piano music for an hour weekly. These include a variety of balance-challenging movements where the difficulty level was progressively raised. After 6 months, the number of fall cases was found to have dipped by 50%, prompting suggestions that music-based exercises may be useful for falls prevention services.

This is good news for the NHS and social care in UK where medical expenditure of fall injuries and deaths by the elderly are amounting up to £6m daily. It is estimated that 7,000 unnecessary deaths via falls can be avoided every year should all the elderly participate in a customized exercise program.

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth as much as a pound of cure. The price of cure is already costing the British government millions of pounds, and they are now on a steep learning curve to recognize the importance of enhancing the standards of falls prevention services.

(Source: BBC)

(Image source: Remain Active)

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2 responses to “Exercising to music may reduce fall rates”

  1. Anonymous says :

    That is amazing!! I am taken aback that this really goes on sometimes in todays day and age. I am very happy I was sat down. I are coming to terms about things moving forward. I will watch closely to see what is happening to this.

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